Category Archives: Classical Music

10 year old blind Down Syndrome kid plays amazing Paganini piano transcription by Liszt

Franz Lizst

Franz Lizst

La Campanella is the third of Franz Liszt‘s six Grandes Etudes de Paganini, based on Paganini’s 2nd Violin Concerto. A demanding piece to execute, such as is common in Liszt’s work, it studies large hand jumps, often larger than an octave, and is a brisk paced Allegretto.

The video shows a 10 year old blind kid with Down Syndrome, Noboyuki Tsuyii, beautifully working his way through the piece and the subsequent standing ovation by the whole auditorium.

If you liked this video watch Pogorelic at the Chopin competition, Yo-Yo Ma’s moving Swan, or Horowitz’s encore in his epic return to Moscow!

Watch here the amazing performance:

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Cultural Beacons: Yo-Yo Ma plays an enchanting The Swan from Saint Saens as encore!

Yo-Yo Ma

Yo-yo Ma, undoubtedly the reference in Cello playing for the past years together with the older genius Rostropovich delightfully interprets a deep and heartfelt version of Sain Saëns “The Swan” from the Carnival of the Animals in a Tokyo performance.

Yo-Yo Ma (born October 7, 1955) is a French American cellist, virtuoso, and orchestral composer. He has received multiple Grammy Awards, the National Medal of Arts in 2001 and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2011. Ma is regarded by some as the most famous cellist of the modern age.

Source: Wikipedia

 

If you like this video try watching Horowitz in his historic return to Moscow in 1986, or Pogorelic playing in the Chopin International Piano Competition

Watch Yo-Yo Ma playing The Swan, from Saint Saens Carnival of the Animals

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Amazing 3 year old kid Conducting Beethoven’s 5th Symphony – Truly Gifted

Ludwig van Beethoven

Watch a 3 year old truly gifted kid conduct Beethoven’s 5th Symphony to the tune of a von Karajan recording.

Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67, was written by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1804–08. This symphony is one of the most popular and best-known compositions in all of classical music, and one of the most often played symphonies. It comprises four movements: an opening sonata, andante, and a fast scherzo which leads attacca to the finale. First performed in Vienna’s Theater an der Wien in 1808, the work achieved its prodigious reputation soon afterwards. E. T. A. Hoffmann described the symphony as “one of the most important works of the time”.

Source: Wikipedia

If you liked this video watch Copenhagen’s Philharmonic Flash Mob performance of ravel’s Bolero at a train station, or How a Bach Canon works:

Watch the video of the 3 year old kid conducting Beethoven’s 5th Symphony

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Flash Mob – Copenhagen’s Philharmonic Playing Ravel’s Bolero at Copenhagen Train Station

Copenhagen Philharmonic Flash Mob at Train Station - Ravel's Bolero

A surprise for train riders. Copenhagen’s Philharmonic orchestra performs Ravel’s Bolero as a startled crowd gathers astonished at the beauty of the music.The Copenhagen Philharmonic Orchestra, also known as the Tivoli Symphony Orchestra, is a symphony orchestra which both serves as Danish Regional Orchestra for the island of Zealand and, for the summer season while the Tivoli Gardens are open, as resident orchestra in the Tivoli Concert Hall.

The history of the orchestra dates back to 1843 when Georg Carstensen in connection with the opening of the Tivoli Gardens engaged Hans Christian Lumbye to be responsible for music in the gardens. Ever since the orchestra has performed in the gardens during the summer season. In 1846, the orchestra was expanded to 33 members and started to perform symphony concerts under the name Tivolis Orkester. In 1848, the composer Niels Gade started to arrange concerts in Copenhagen with the musicians from the Tivoli Orchestra as a basis for the winter concerts.

Source: Wikipedia

If you like this video watch “How a Bach Canon Works”

Watch Copenhagen Philharmonic Orchestra perform at the train station:

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Video – How a Bach Canon Works

Johannes Sebastian Bach

This video shows the intricacy and complexity of Bach’s Canons. The enigmatic 1747  Canon 1 à 2 from Johannes Sebastien Bach’s Musical Offering. The manuscript depicts a single musical sequence that is to be played front to back and back to front.

Johann Sebastian Bach (21 March 1685, O.S.31 March 1685, N.S. – 28 July 1750, N.S.) was a German composer, organist, harpsichordist, violist, and violinist of the Baroque Period. He enriched many established German styles through his skill in counterpoint, harmonic and motivic organisation, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms, and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France. Bach wrote much music, which was revered for its intellectual depth, technical command, and artistic beauty. Many of his works are still known today, such as the Brandenburg Concertos, the Mass in B minor, the Well-Tempered Clavier, and his passions, cantatas, partitas, and organ works.

Source: Wikipedia

If you like this video, we recommend “Copenhagen’s Philharmonic Orchestra Flash Mob playing Ravel’s Bolero at the Copenhagen’s Train Station”

Watch Johannes Sebastian Bach’s Canon video

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Cultural Beacons: Vladimir Horowitz encore in Moscow. 1986. Schumann’s Traumerei

Russian pianist Vladimir Horowitz

In 1986, the Russian pianist Vladimir Horowitz gave a recital in Moscow after many years in exile. Gorbachev‘s Glasnost and Perestroika allowed for the visiting of major exiled intellectuals such as Solzhenitsyn or Horowitz.

In this historic performance, and specifically during his encore, the camera captures the deep russian nostalgia and the love of its people for beauty and music.

If you like this video, check out Yo-Yo Ma playing an enchanting The Swan from Saint SaensHow a Bach Canon works, or Ivo Pogorelic at the Chopin International competition when he became a legend!

Vladimir Horowitz in Moscow. 1986. Encore, Schumann’s Traumerei.

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Cultural Beacons: Ivo Pogorelic at the Chopin Competition – Scherzo No3, Op39

In 1980, a young Serbian pianistIvo Pogorelic amazed the world with astonishing performances at the Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw, allegedly the most influential piano contest in the world. His energy, technique and expression tantalized the audience.

Much to the surprise of many, he did not go beyond the third round. However, his performances were so compelling, that one of the judges, legendary pianist Martha Argerich, publicly declared him a genius, and left the competition given the unfairness with which she thought Pogorelic had been treated.

And so the legend of one of the most influential and revered pianists of the end of the Twentieth Century and the beginning of the Twenty First began.

This video is straight from one of his performances at the mentioned Chopin Competition. It has become a landmark of musical expression.

If you liked this video watch How a Bach Canon worksHorowitz’s encore in Moscow in 1986 playing Schumman’s Traumerei, or Yo-Yo Ma’s delightful interpretation of Saint Saens the Swan in Tokyo!

Watch Ivo Pogorelic at the Chopin International Piano Competition in 1980:

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